Gregor Duncan arrived in New York City in 1933, and began working for the old Life magazine as an editorial cartoonist in the same year. His cartoons reflected the magazine's political outlook, from initial support of FDR's New Deal, to a later opposition of what the publication perceived as FDR's bloated bureaucracy. Duncan continued working for Life until the magazine ceased publication in November 1936.

 

While working for Life, Duncan cultivated other clients in the magazine business during his short time in New York. He he had cartoon and illustration work appearing in Reader's Digest, Collier's Weekly, and Cosmopolitan. Duncan also drew and painted covers for the Literary Digest, Judge, and For Men Only.

 

Duncan was also active in the newspaper field, drawing features for PM, the left-wing daily published by Ralph Ingersoll, from its inception in 1940. Duncan acted as a journalist-illustrator for PM, covering all sorts of topics and events throughout the city. A lifelong left-winger, Duncan also contributed work to the Communist Party's Daily Worker, but signed those pieces with the pseduonym "George Dickson", which was a variation of his mother's maiden name of Dixon.

 

During his time in the Army Air Force, Duncan contributed writing and illustrations to both PM and LOOK magazine, in an ongoing effort to keep the public informed.

 

 

Drawing of Glen Kitzmeller, the University of Oregon quarterback nicknamed the Flying Dutchman.  San Francisco Call-Bulletin, 1929.Ink drawing done for the San Francisco Call-Bulletin in 1929, documenting a fire that He's the Type feature piece done on John Henry Nash, a San Francisco area typesetter.  From the San Francisco Call-Bulletin, 1929.  With thanks to the McCune Collection.A litho crayon editorial cartoon appearing in Life magazine in April 1934.  FDR is portrayed sowing the seeds of wealth and prosperity.Shades of 2009, as a powerfully drawn FDR is shown taking Wall Street matters into his own hands.  Life magazine, May 1934.A beautifully drawn double-page spread which appeared in Cosmopolitan in May 1934.  Babe Ruth appears in the lower left corner, in 
A beautiful litho crayon cover of the Literary Digest, from June 16, 1934This litho crayon editorial cartoon accompanied an Op-Ed piece on Social Security which offered no real opinion, excep that whatever plan is implemented must work.  Life magazine, March 1935.Life magazine's opinion of FDR began to change, as is seen in this January 1936 cartoon featuring James Farley, FDR's campaign manager in 1932 and 1936.  Jobs are precariously perched upon the Capitol.Ulysses Sam embarks upon a Democratic Odyssey in an April 1936 Life cartoon.  Terrific pen & ink drawingA bureaucratic vulture sits perched upon the Capitol building dome in this May 1936 Life magazine litho crayon cartoon.  Life's editorial outlook on FDR got harsher and harsher towards the end of the magazine's run.The first of Life's anti-Roosevelt cartoons using the theme of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland.  James Farley is the March Hare, and the teacups are labeled witih New Deal programs.  May 1936.This Alice in Wonderland spoof rails against FDR's unfulfilled campaign promises from the 1932 election.  Life magazine, June 1936The first of four illustrations of Helen Stephens, winner of two gold medals at the 1936 Olympics.  Collier's, July 1936.The second of four illustrations of Helen Stephens, winner of two gold medals at the 1936 Olympics.  Collier's, July 1936.The third of four illustrations of Helen Stephens, winner of two gold medals at the 1936 Olympics.  Collier's, July 1936.he fouth of four illustrations of Helen Stephens, winner of two gold medals at the 1936 Olympics.  Collier's, July 1936.
This cartoon from Life depicts James Farley as a twister, captioned with one of the American west's songs of individualism.  August 1936FDR, Farley, and GOP presidential candidate Alf Landon are featured in this September 1936 Life cartoon, as Landon tries to soothe the A June 1937 cover of Judge magazine, featuring a Duncan self-portrait, along the future Janice DuncanAn ink and watercolor cover for For Men Only!, from September 1937.An ink and watercolor cover for For Men Only!, from October 1937.
An interior cartoon from For Men Only!, from December 1937.Duncan did four drawings for this feature on the Coney Island Velodrome motorized bike races, held every Sunday night.  PM, August 11, 1940.Some of Duncan's best work for PM were done for this November 13, 1940 feature on the Thrift House Playground kids.  The drawings are reminiscent of Duncan's book illustrations.RKO Pictures stage a wedding reception for two of its stars, Lucille Ball and Desi Arnez.  Duncan drew images live at the event, which appeared in PM on December 12, 1940.  He even brought a piece of wedding cake home to Janice.While Duncan was stationed at Tarpon Springs, Florida, he documented emergency rubber raft tests that were conducted on men in two rafts.  This page appeared in the October 22, 1943 edition of Yank.  In December, a different feature on the same subject appeared in Look magazine.While Duncan was stationed at Tarpon Springs, Florida, he documented emergency rubber raft tests that were conducted on men in two rafts.  This drawing appeared in LOOK magazine on December 2, 1943.Another set of four drawings from the rubber raft emergency tests that appeared in LOOK on December 2, 1943.  The wash tones on the illustrations are moody and beautiful.This feature appeared in PM on June 1, 1944, shortly after news of Duncan's death reached Stateside.  The piece features a number of Duncan self-portraits, as he shows his own inductions into the AAF.Gregor Duncan, using his George Dickson pseudonym, New Masses, October 22, 1935.A political cartoon that appeared in May 1935 issue of LIFE magazine.  Hitler uses the German people as cannon fodder.